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A Handbook on Worldviews

A Handbook on World Views: A Catalogue for World View Shoppers

2013

By Norman L. Geisler and William D. Watkins

Available as a Kindle e-book at Amazon here:

This book is an updated (third edition) version of the book formerly titled Worlds Apart: A Handbook on World Views; Second Edition, which is still available as a soft-cover printedbook from Wipf&Stock here: https://wipfandstock.com/worlds-apart.html

CONTENTS
PREFACE 5
INTRODUCTION – AN INVITATION TO OTHER WORLDS 6
CHAPTER 1: THEISM – A WORLD PLUS AN INFINITE GOD 15
CHAPTER 2: ATHEISM – A WORLD WITHOUT GOD 38
CHAPTER 3: PANTHEISM – A WORLD THAT IS GOD 66
CHAPTER 4: PANENTHEISM – A WORLD IN GOD 95
CHAPTER 5: DEISM – A WORLD ON ITS OWN MADE BY GOD 131
CHAPTER 6: FINITE GODISM – A WORLD WITH A FINITE GOD 166
CHAPTER 7: POLYTHEISM – A WORLD WITH MORE THAN ONE GOD 193
CONCLUSION: CHOOSING A WORLD VIEW 227
GLOSSARY 239
BIBLIOGRAPHY 243
APPENDIX A: ISLAM AS A WORLD VIEW 256

Biblical Inerrancy: The Historical Evidence

Biblical Inerrancy: The Historical Evidence
By Norman L. Geisler
2013

Available at Amazon only as a Kindle e-book here: 

The first edition of this book was published under the title of Decide for Yourself: How History Views the Bible by Zondervan in 1982 and republished by Wipf and Stock (2004). Print versions of the first edition can be found at Wipf and Stock here.

Biblical Inerrancy: The Historical Evidence is a revised, second edition of Decide for Yourself.

From the Preface
WHO WROTE THE BIBLE? God or men? If God inspired men to write the Bible, what did He inspire? Their thoughts? Or their words as well? How far does inspiration extend? Does it include only spiritual matters, or does it also include history and science?
The battle for the Bible has the average Christian understandably confused. Actually there is more than one battle, for there are at least six views on the nature and origin of the Bible. In using labels to identify the various views of Scripture, we must be aware that such labels are not absolute in the sense that they precisely define all those who hold to one position or another. They represent the core position of each of the various categories, but there is a divergence of view¬points within the categories, and some theologians may even hold to different elements of more than one category.

  1. Most evangelicals hold the “orthodox” view (see Chap. 5); that is, the Bible is divinely inspired in its very words, including matters of history and science. This is also the view of The International Council on Biblical Inerrancy.
  2. “Liberal” theologians (see Chap. 6), on the other hand, believe that only parts of the Bible are divine. They see great religious value in much of Scripture; but other parts are rejected as myth, and some are even consid¬ered barbaric.
  3. Some “Fundamentalists” (see Chap. 7), strongly reacting against liberals, have affirmed that the Bible was ver¬bally dictated by God word-for-word.
  4. “Neo-orthodoxy” (see Chap. 8), another reaction to liberalism but without returning to a fully orthodox view of Scripture, holds that the Bible is not a revelation from God. Rather, it is a fallible human record of the revelation God gave in His past actions. That is, God does not reveal Himself in words but only in events.
  5. “Liberal-Evangelicals” (see Chap. 9) believe that the Bible is wholly human in origin, replete with historical, scientific, and religious errors. They believe God takes these human words and “elevates” them to be a vehicle of His word.
  6. Much of the contemporary debate is between the orthodox or evangelical Christians and the “Neo-evangelicals” (see Chap. 10). The latter believe that the Bible is infallible but not inerrant; that is, the Bible speaks with divine authority and complete truthfulness on salvation matters but is not inerrant (without error) in historical and scientific matters.
    This book was written for those who do not have ready access to the writings of the main teachers in the church for the past nearly two centuries. As will be seen, their citations support the Orthodox view of the church down through the centuries up to modern times. The other views deviate from the orthodox view because of their acceptance to one or more modern philosophical influences.

Contents

PREFACE.. 6
CHAPTER 1: A Biblical View of Inspiration. 9
The Old Testament. 9
The New Testament. 12
CHAPTER 2: The Patristic View of the Bible. 17
Clement of Rome (A. D. 30—100). 17
Justin Martyr (A. D. 100—165). 17
Irenaeus (Second Century A. D.). 19
Tertullian (A. D. 160—220). 20
Origen (A. D. 184/185—254/254). 21
Clement Of Alexandria (A.D. 150—215). 24
CHAPTER 3: The Medieval View of Inspiration. 27
Augustine (A. D. 354—430). 27
Thomas Aquinas (A. D. 1225—1274). 31
CHAPTER 4: The Reformation View of Inspiration. 33
Martin Luther (A. D. 1483—1546). 33
John Calvin (A. D. 1509—1564). 38
CHAPTER 5: The Post-Reformation Orthodox View of Inspiration. 41
Post-Reformation Orthodox View.. 41
CHAPTER 6: Liberal Views of Inspiration. 47
Harold Dewolf (1905—1986). 47
Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878—1969). 51
Process Theology and the Bible. 56
CHAPTER 7: A Fundamentalist View of Inspiration. 58
CHAPTER 8: The Neo-orthodox View of Inspiration. 64
Karl Barth (1886—1968). 64
Emil Brunner (1889—1966). 67
CHAPTER 9: A Liberal-Evangelical View of the Bible. 75
CHAPTER 10: The Neo-evangelical View of Inspiration. 85
Gerrit C. Berkouwer (1903—1996). 85
Jack B. Rogers (1934–). 91
POSTSCRIPT.. 95

Biblical Errancy: An Analysis of its Philosophical Roots

Biblical Errancy An Analysis of its Philosophical Roots
Revised, Second Edition
Edited by Norman L. Geisler
2013

Available at Amazon as a Kindle e-book here: 

This second edition has slightly a slightly updated prologue, slightly updated epilogue, and has one new chapter (Chapter 9 on Process Theology, Whitehead, Ogden, and others).


The first edition of this book was published by Zondervan in 1981 and again by Wipf and Stock in 2004. Print versions of the first edition may still be available at Wipf and Stock here: https://wipfandstock.com/biblical-errancy.html

Contents
PREFACE. 5
Ch. 1 Norman L. Geisler, Ph.D. – INDUCTIVISM, MATERIALISM, & RATIONALISM: BACON, HOBBES, SPINOZA. – p.7
Ch. 2 Gary R. Habermas, Ph.D. – SKEPTICISM: DAVID HUME. 21
Ch. 3 David Beck, Ph.D. – AGNOSTICISM: IMMANUEL KANT. 48
Ch. 4 Winfried Corduan, Ph.D. – TRANSCENDENTALISM: GEORG W. F. HEGEL. 77
Ch. 5 E. Herbert Nygren, Ph.D. – EXISTENTIALISM: SØREN KIERKEGAARD.. 99
Ch. 6 Terry L. Miethe, Ph.D. – ATHEISM: FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE. 127
Ch. 7 John S. Feinberg, Ph.D. – NONCOGNITIVISM: LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN.. 156
Ch. 8 Howard M. Ducharme, Jr., Ph.D. – MYSTICISM: MARTIN HEIDEGGER.. 195
Ch. 9 Norman L. Geisler, Ph.D. – PROCESS THEOLOGY: WHITEHEAD, OGDEN, AND OTHERS. 218
EPILOGUE – p.252
NOTES – p. 263-300

Should Old Aquinas be Forgotten?

Should Old Aquinas be Forgotten?
Many Say Yes, But the Author Says No!
Revised, Second Edition
by Dr. Norman L. Geisler
2013

The first edition of this book was published under the title of Thomas Aquinas: An Evangelical Appraisal in 1991 by Baker Book House (ISBN: 978-0801038440) and republished in 2003 with the same title by Wipf & Stock Publishers (ISBN: 978-1592441549). Printed versions (softcover) of the 2003 unrevised edition may be purchased from WipfandStock.com.

This 2013 version is a light but complete revision of all chapters accomplished by Dr. Geisler in 2013. Most importantly this version adds two completely new chapters—one on evil and one on the origin, nature, and destiny of human beings. In addition, it updates the bibliography with some of the most important recent works by and on Aquinas. This is still the only complete work on Aquinas by an evangelical Scholar available in print today.

Contents
Forward. 5
Chap. 1: The Contemporary Relevance of Aquinas. 7
Chap. 2: The Life of Aquinas. 19
Chap. 3: An Overview of the Thought of Aquinas. 30
Chap. 4: The Bible. 36
Chap. 5: Faith and Reason. 49
Chap. 6: The First Principles of Knowledge. 63
Chap. 7: Reality. 83
Chap. 8: God’s Nature. 94
Chap. 9: God’s Existence. 111
Chap. 10: Human Nature. 129
Chap. 11: Religious Language. 146
Chap. 12: Evil 159
Chap. 13: Law and Morality. 177
Epilogue. 190
End Notes. 191
Select Bibliography. 219
APppendix 1: The Major Writings of Aquinas. 221
Appendix 2: A Chronology of Aquinas’ Life. 222
Appendix 3: God, Angels, and Humans. 223
Index of Subjects and Persons. 224

The Battle for the Resurrection

The Battle for the Resurrection, Revised, Third Edition
by Dr. Norman Geisler
2013

This book is available as an e-book at Amazon here: 

This 242 page e-book is a slight revision of the book originally published in 1992. The second edition of this book is available in softcover printed edition at https://wipfandstock.com/the-battle-for-the-resurrection.html and in the Logos format at https://www.logos.com/product/9148/the-battle-for-resurrection.

Overview
First it was the battle for the Bible; now it is the battle for the resurrection. First the question was whether we can trust what the Bible says about itself; now the question is whether we can trust what the Bible says about the resurrection. First it was whether inspiration covered only spiritual matters but not historical and scientific statements. Now it is whether the resurrection body is only spiritual or whether it is material, and historically and empirically observable. Geisler’s powerful book on the resurrection defends and explains this central doctrine in light of recent debate, controversy, and skepticism.
Dr. Geisler fought battles for the orthodox doctrine of the resurrection and corrected the unorthodox views of other evangelical seminary professors. The book that started the controversy was Murray Harris’ Raised Immortal (1985). Norman Geisler wrote The Battle for the Resurrection (1989) in response to Harris’ book. Harris responded with another book, From Grave to Glory ( 1990). In 1993, Geisler published In Defense of the Resurrection as a response to Harris.

Praise for the Print Edition

Since the belief in a purely spiritual resurrection of Christ is prevalent in many cults, those involved in countering the rise and growth of cults would benefit greatly from reading this book.
—Walter Martin, author of The Kingdom of the Cults

Dr. Geisler’s book is effectively designed as [an] antidote to the misery of turning Christ’s factual resurrection into an event outside the bounds of ordinary history.
—Dr. John Warwick Montgomery, author of History and Christianity

Geisler demonstrates not only the danger in the theology of various cults but also the tendency to discount the bodily resurrection of the Lord, even among evangelicals. It is essential reading for every pastor and student.
—Dr. Paige Patterson, author of Song of Solomon

The proclamation that Jesus was raised in the same physical body in which he died is just as important today as it was in the first century. The book signals such a call to the importance of this doctrine.
—Dr. Gary Habermas, Distinguished Professor of Apologetics and Philosophy, Liberty University

===CONTENTS===
Dedication 4
Foreword by Dr. Robert D. Culver 6
Introduction 12
1 | The Battle for the Resurrection 14
2 | It Makes a Difference 22
3 | The Bible on the Resurrection 30
4 | I Believe in the Resurrection of the Flesh 40
5 | Denials of the Physical Resurrection 54
6 | Denials of the Physical Resurrection in the Church 73
7 | Physical Resurrection vs. Immaterial Resurrection 94
8 | Evidence for the Physical Resurrection 113
9 | Lessons to be Learned 125
10 | Drawing the Line 140
11 | A Response to Murray Harris 154
APPENDIX A | Does the Resurrection Body Have the Same articles? 180
APPENDIX B | Resurrection Appearances Were Not Theophanies 182
APPENDIX C | Christ’s Deity and Humanity Before and After the Resurrection 185
APPENDIX D | Physical Continuity of Christ Human Body Before and After the Resurrection 186
APPENDIX E | The Old Testament Jewish View of Resurrection 190
APPENDIX F | When Do Believers Receive Their Resurrection Bodies? 193
APPENDIX G | Was Jesus’ Resurrected Body Essentially MATERIAL? 197
APPENDIX H | A Survey on the Resurrection 201
APPENDIX I | Report of the AD HOC Committee to Examine the Views of Dr. Murray J. Harris 203
Notes 215
A Glossary of Important Terms 239
Select Bibliography 240
More Information 242